Finger Joints in Woodworking

Sermin Yesilada and Vijayeta Davda

Finger joints are a type of joint where two pieces of material that come together with intersecting complementary rectangular cuts.  Similar to a dovetail joint, finger joints are usually cut at 90 degree angles, but can also be triangular.

The strength of the joint depends on the gluing surface.  Longer joints are stronger:

Finger joint strength

Finger joint strength

Strength: Long grain to long grain joints with ample gluing surface.

Aesthetic qualities: Can vary spacing and sizes of fingers to create a design

Weakness: Must be glued, or it will pull apart.

Uses:

Originated in created wooden boxes or crates

Finger jointed long lumber pieces

Casework

Decorative boxes

Construction:

Created by cutting kerfs into the wood on a table saw.  The blade gauge determines the width and multiple passes can expand the joint width.

Cutting Finger Joints video

Resources:

AceCo Precision Tools.  2008. (1 Feb 2013.)

Popular Wood Working Magazine.  “Greene & Greene Finger Joint.”  F&W Media Inc. 2010. (1 Feb 2013.)

“Shop Notes.” No. 110. August 2010. <http://www.shopnotes.com/files/issues/110/fast-and-easy-finger-joints.pdf&gt; (1 Feb 2013.)

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